P.MAI Spotlight: Inesh Putri dishes on golf, pageants and culinary pursuits

Posted on by Phuong Mai

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_She’s young. She’s gorgeous. And she has a killer golfing handicap. Meet the role model Inesh Putri Tjiptadi Chandra of Bali, Indonesia. _

We had the privilege of working with this talented lady for our latest photoshoot in Bali and chatted with her about life as a professional golfer, beauty queen, and restaurateur.

_ Note: We tried her restaurant Bo & Bun in Seminyak and highly recommend it. Four words: 12-hour beef pho._


**Tell us a little about yourself—where you grew up (family, environment) and how that helped shape who you are. **

I was born in Bali and grew up here with two older brothers in a loving family. I grew up as a tomboy (having two brothers and all) so I liked to play a lot of sports growing up.  I used to do basketball, badminton, football, athletics, swimming, and eventually golf. Sports have always been a big part of my life and taught me so many things to help to get where I am now.

You began golfing at an early age, and won the Bali Governor’s Cup at just 13 years old, becoming the youngest player and first female to win the event. How did you get started and how did you decide you wanted to go pro?

I started a bit late actually. I was twelve when I had my first golf lesson. My parents are also golfers who played regularly every weekend. My mom used to play for the Bali Team as well in the National competition.  I would normally go with them to the course and hit my sand wedge and chase golf balls. I wanted to start earlier, but I was too small and too skinny that my parents thought I wasn’t strong enough to play. Finally, when I reached 12 years old, I got my first golf lesson and the rest is history. ☺ image

** We heard that you’ll be representing the national team in a golf tournament later this year. Congrats! How are you preparing? What are you most excited about?**

Yes. I just got the news that I will be playing again for the Bali Team this year. I played the same tournament in 2004 and 2008 where we won the gold medal for the team. It was an awesome time for me, and this tournament will always have a soft spot in my heart.

Since I am currently still busy with my restaurant, I don’t have much time to practice like I used to. But I will definitely make time to practice 3-4 times a week and work on my mental game. I don’t have any pre-game rituals, but I just try to be calm and not get so emotional during the round.

I am most excited about being able to play with my friends during the tournament. Golf is normally an individual game, but this time you get to play as a team, work as a team, and of course represent our hometown together.

Are there lessons from golfing that you apply to your everyday life?

A lot actually. I always say, without golf I wouldn’t be where I am today. As a sportswoman, I learned the meaning of hard work, dedication, passion, and never giving up. I learned that everything we do in life needs effort, patience, and dedication. These things have helped me achieve things in life and make me a better person. image

** In addition to golf, you’re known for winning Miss Indonesia in 2012 and finishing top 15 in Miss World as well. What did you learn from your pageant experiences?**

That was a life changing experience for me and opened my eyes to a lot of things. I grew up playing a lot of sports and not exposed to other things besides golf. So when I was Miss Indonesia, I learned about makeup, modeling, public speaking, table manner and interviewing, and of course a lot of charity work.

Moreover, I learned more about my country, Indonesia by going to places I never imagined I would. (Indonesia consists of over 17,000 islands!) I was exposed to the problems the country faced and met some very influential people I could’ve only dreamed of meeting—from artists, musicians, politicians, and even the President! I felt I was in a special position where I could make a difference and help people.

Miss World was also another life changing for me. To be able to compete with 116 beautiful women around the world was such an honor for me. I met so many amazing people that I became friends with and learned about their unique cultures. I never dreamed of getting into Top 15, but I did and it’s a very humbling experience for me.

Of course it wasn’t always glamorous. One of the major challenges was being exposed to the public eye, which wasn’t the easiest thing for me. I would get hate tweets or messages every now and then that made me feel upset and down. I was also expected to always in my best behavior to avoid criticism from the media. I needed to learn to ignore the negative and focus on the positives. :) image

**What did you hope to achieve going into the competition? Did it live up to your expectations? **

My hope was to promote awareness for education among children under 5 years old in Indonesia. Many children in the rural or underdeveloped areas of Indonesia are not getting any kind of education. We also found that children who were only exposed to school at the age of 5 and older were likely to quit school after a few years because they weren’t used to the learning environment and ended up in the streets. This can be a vicious cycle for their family.

We believe that children develop critical skills, behavior, and attitude during the first 5 years of their life or what we called “The Golden Age.” That’s why my program worked together with the people and leaders in those areas to create a small education center started for children under 5 years old to be able to get basic learning. We believe that once they received a proper education at an early age, they would want to continue their education even further. We donated books and learning materials, and put together small study rooms so they can come and get education for free.

I believe that in order for our country to grow and change for the better, we need educated generations who can help this country make a difference in the world. By joining Miss World and bringing this problem to the attention of the world, I hoped to help Indonesia’s education in the future. image

We both share a passion for food—specifically Vietnamese cuisine. Can you tell us about your background in culinary arts?

I LOVE FOOD! My parents own a restaurant, so I had the luxury of eating different things growing up. My parents would always take us to try different restaurants, teaching us different foods and flavors. I love it because food brings people together. The feeling I get when I discover new food after eating a delicious meal is one of the happiest moment of my life. I appreciate food, the way people cook it, and the passion that goes behind it.

What was the inspiration behind your restaurant Bo & Bun?

Bo & Bun started because of my boyfriend’s and my love for Vietnamese cuisine. We created Bo & Bun because we want to introduce Vietnamese cuisine to the people in Bali. I fell in love with Vietnamese cuisine when I first had pho in Australia. I had the Vietnamese salad and I was in love! ☺

When opening Bo & Bun, we make sure that everything on the menu is the food we love to eat. So we weren’t trying to make a restaurant to please everyone. We want to make a restaurant with all the food we love to eat, and we want other people to experience what we think is great food. We want to share it with all of our customers.

What are some of your favorite places to eat in Bali?

The hidden places that is not very touristy but cooked with soul and love. My favorite pizza place is called Seminyak Italian Corner. It is a small shack with a few seating area but great awesome food that will keep you coming back! image

**What’s one thing anyone who visits Bali must do? **

They must try BO & BUN! Hahaha kidding.

I think they should explore Bali’s nature such as Ubud, Uluwatu, Bedugul, and Lovina. They should visit the temple, hike the mountains, see the dolphins, and enjoy the paddy fields. If they are lucky, they should experience the Balinese culture that is very immersing.

We admire how you’ve been able to pursue so many different passions. Any advice for women interested in taking the leap to pursue uncharted waters?

I think the key is not get comfortable. Once you are comfortable, you can no longer achieve things. I always try to challenge myself with different things. I tell myself that I should be doing more or I can do more and I am still young.

The other thing I like to think about is: twenty years from now, if I look back to my life, will I be satisfied and happy with the person I become? Have I achieved enough?

Time goes by really fast, and I want to make the best out of it and live to my full potential.

Finally: How do you carry on beautifully?

I think a person can carry on beautifully if they keep challenging themselves. Educate yourself with new things, be happy with the person you are, and be the best person that you can be! image

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_She’s young. She’s gorgeous. And she has a killer golfing handicap. Meet the role model Inesh Putri Tjiptadi Chandra of Bali, Indonesia. _

We had the privilege of working with this talented lady for our latest photoshoot in Bali and chatted with her about life as a professional golfer, beauty queen, and restaurateur.

_ Note: We tried her restaurant Bo & Bun in Seminyak and highly recommend it. Four words: 12-hour beef pho._


**Tell us a little about yourself—where you grew up (family, environment) and how that helped shape who you are. **

I was born in Bali and grew up here with two older brothers in a loving family. I grew up as a tomboy (having two brothers and all) so I liked to play a lot of sports growing up.  I used to do basketball, badminton, football, athletics, swimming, and eventually golf. Sports have always been a big part of my life and taught me so many things to help to get where I am now.

You began golfing at an early age, and won the Bali Governor’s Cup at just 13 years old, becoming the youngest player and first female to win the event. How did you get started and how did you decide you wanted to go pro?

I started a bit late actually. I was twelve when I had my first golf lesson. My parents are also golfers who played regularly every weekend. My mom used to play for the Bali Team as well in the National competition.  I would normally go with them to the course and hit my sand wedge and chase golf balls. I wanted to start earlier, but I was too small and too skinny that my parents thought I wasn’t strong enough to play. Finally, when I reached 12 years old, I got my first golf lesson and the rest is history. ☺ image

** We heard that you’ll be representing the national team in a golf tournament later this year. Congrats! How are you preparing? What are you most excited about?**

Yes. I just got the news that I will be playing again for the Bali Team this year. I played the same tournament in 2004 and 2008 where we won the gold medal for the team. It was an awesome time for me, and this tournament will always have a soft spot in my heart.

Since I am currently still busy with my restaurant, I don’t have much time to practice like I used to. But I will definitely make time to practice 3-4 times a week and work on my mental game. I don’t have any pre-game rituals, but I just try to be calm and not get so emotional during the round.

I am most excited about being able to play with my friends during the tournament. Golf is normally an individual game, but this time you get to play as a team, work as a team, and of course represent our hometown together.

Are there lessons from golfing that you apply to your everyday life?

A lot actually. I always say, without golf I wouldn’t be where I am today. As a sportswoman, I learned the meaning of hard work, dedication, passion, and never giving up. I learned that everything we do in life needs effort, patience, and dedication. These things have helped me achieve things in life and make me a better person. image

** In addition to golf, you’re known for winning Miss Indonesia in 2012 and finishing top 15 in Miss World as well. What did you learn from your pageant experiences?**

That was a life changing experience for me and opened my eyes to a lot of things. I grew up playing a lot of sports and not exposed to other things besides golf. So when I was Miss Indonesia, I learned about makeup, modeling, public speaking, table manner and interviewing, and of course a lot of charity work.

Moreover, I learned more about my country, Indonesia by going to places I never imagined I would. (Indonesia consists of over 17,000 islands!) I was exposed to the problems the country faced and met some very influential people I could’ve only dreamed of meeting—from artists, musicians, politicians, and even the President! I felt I was in a special position where I could make a difference and help people.

Miss World was also another life changing for me. To be able to compete with 116 beautiful women around the world was such an honor for me. I met so many amazing people that I became friends with and learned about their unique cultures. I never dreamed of getting into Top 15, but I did and it’s a very humbling experience for me.

Of course it wasn’t always glamorous. One of the major challenges was being exposed to the public eye, which wasn’t the easiest thing for me. I would get hate tweets or messages every now and then that made me feel upset and down. I was also expected to always in my best behavior to avoid criticism from the media. I needed to learn to ignore the negative and focus on the positives. :) image

**What did you hope to achieve going into the competition? Did it live up to your expectations? **

My hope was to promote awareness for education among children under 5 years old in Indonesia. Many children in the rural or underdeveloped areas of Indonesia are not getting any kind of education. We also found that children who were only exposed to school at the age of 5 and older were likely to quit school after a few years because they weren’t used to the learning environment and ended up in the streets. This can be a vicious cycle for their family.

We believe that children develop critical skills, behavior, and attitude during the first 5 years of their life or what we called “The Golden Age.” That’s why my program worked together with the people and leaders in those areas to create a small education center started for children under 5 years old to be able to get basic learning. We believe that once they received a proper education at an early age, they would want to continue their education even further. We donated books and learning materials, and put together small study rooms so they can come and get education for free.

I believe that in order for our country to grow and change for the better, we need educated generations who can help this country make a difference in the world. By joining Miss World and bringing this problem to the attention of the world, I hoped to help Indonesia’s education in the future. image

We both share a passion for food—specifically Vietnamese cuisine. Can you tell us about your background in culinary arts?

I LOVE FOOD! My parents own a restaurant, so I had the luxury of eating different things growing up. My parents would always take us to try different restaurants, teaching us different foods and flavors. I love it because food brings people together. The feeling I get when I discover new food after eating a delicious meal is one of the happiest moment of my life. I appreciate food, the way people cook it, and the passion that goes behind it.

What was the inspiration behind your restaurant Bo & Bun?

Bo & Bun started because of my boyfriend’s and my love for Vietnamese cuisine. We created Bo & Bun because we want to introduce Vietnamese cuisine to the people in Bali. I fell in love with Vietnamese cuisine when I first had pho in Australia. I had the Vietnamese salad and I was in love! ☺

When opening Bo & Bun, we make sure that everything on the menu is the food we love to eat. So we weren’t trying to make a restaurant to please everyone. We want to make a restaurant with all the food we love to eat, and we want other people to experience what we think is great food. We want to share it with all of our customers.

What are some of your favorite places to eat in Bali?

The hidden places that is not very touristy but cooked with soul and love. My favorite pizza place is called Seminyak Italian Corner. It is a small shack with a few seating area but great awesome food that will keep you coming back! image

**What’s one thing anyone who visits Bali must do? **

They must try BO & BUN! Hahaha kidding.

I think they should explore Bali’s nature such as Ubud, Uluwatu, Bedugul, and Lovina. They should visit the temple, hike the mountains, see the dolphins, and enjoy the paddy fields. If they are lucky, they should experience the Balinese culture that is very immersing.

We admire how you’ve been able to pursue so many different passions. Any advice for women interested in taking the leap to pursue uncharted waters?

I think the key is not get comfortable. Once you are comfortable, you can no longer achieve things. I always try to challenge myself with different things. I tell myself that I should be doing more or I can do more and I am still young.

The other thing I like to think about is: twenty years from now, if I look back to my life, will I be satisfied and happy with the person I become? Have I achieved enough?

Time goes by really fast, and I want to make the best out of it and live to my full potential.

Finally: How do you carry on beautifully?

I think a person can carry on beautifully if they keep challenging themselves. Educate yourself with new things, be happy with the person you are, and be the best person that you can be! image