What’s in a Name: Behind the Valletta

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It was a glorious sunny day in July of 2014. Our ship glided gently into Malta’s Grand Harbour, and I fought every urge to pull a Rose from Titantic and pretend to fly. I was greeted immediately by salty winds, a panorama of the Mediterranean, and the sounds of church bells ringing in the distance. ((Exhale))

The stunning island nation of Malta bursted with culture and history. Colorful banners adorned the streets to celebrate the summer festivals, and homes boasted freshly painted doors in preparation. 

I fell in love instantly.

With its Mediterranean cuisine, perfect climate, and relaxed way of life, Malta was paradise. But what drew me in wasn’t the luxurious lifestyle, but rather the richness of its history, manifested by the splendor of 16th century buildings and structures that have been so carefully preserved within an urban environment.

Beneath its centuries-old cracks were layers of histories, ranging from Roman to Norman to French and British, all shaping what Malta is today. For example, its language is a linguistic cocktail that sounds Arabic with half of its vocabulary coming from Italian and mixes of French and English.

 St. John's Co Cathedral Valletta Malta

I strolled through its capitol, Valletta, pausing inside the famous St. John's Co-Cathedral, an impressive treasure of Baroque artand architecture. Built in the 1570s, the interior is extremely ornate and designed with intricate carved walls and painted figures that appear three-dimensional through shadowing. The most important masterpieces by Caravaggio are centrally displayed. But my favorite part was the eight chapels, each one dedicated to a patron saint of the langues (regions). Here's a photo of the Chapel of Italy, dedicated to St Catherine.

I also learned that because of its strategic location as a military and naval fortress, Malta was ­­­one of the most heavily bombed countries during WWII. Valletta’s streets and buildings, including the Royal Opera House, were left in ruins. And yet, despite having survived battles for hundreds of years, Valletta has remained strong and victorious. 

I decided to name our first collection of backpacks after this historical town of Valletta. There’s something powerful and alluring about its resiliency and colorful riches. Our Valletta backpack represents the strength and beauty that comes from understanding ones roots and fighting for what you believe in.


That’s who we are. We celebrate each other’s cultural diversities, and we stand unafraid and unbridled by what tomorrow brings.

It was a glorious sunny day in July of 2014. Our ship glided gently into Malta’s Grand Harbour, and I fought every urge to pull a Rose from Titantic and pretend to fly. I was greeted immediately by salty winds, a panorama of the Mediterranean, and the sounds of church bells ringing in the distance. ((Exhale))

The stunning island nation of Malta bursted with culture and history. Colorful banners adorned the streets to celebrate the summer festivals, and homes boasted freshly painted doors in preparation. 

I fell in love instantly.

With its Mediterranean cuisine, perfect climate, and relaxed way of life, Malta was paradise. But what drew me in wasn’t the luxurious lifestyle, but rather the richness of its history, manifested by the splendor of 16th century buildings and structures that have been so carefully preserved within an urban environment.

Beneath its centuries-old cracks were layers of histories, ranging from Roman to Norman to French and British, all shaping what Malta is today. For example, its language is a linguistic cocktail that sounds Arabic with half of its vocabulary coming from Italian and mixes of French and English.

 St. John's Co Cathedral Valletta Malta

I strolled through its capitol, Valletta, pausing inside the famous St. John's Co-Cathedral, an impressive treasure of Baroque artand architecture. Built in the 1570s, the interior is extremely ornate and designed with intricate carved walls and painted figures that appear three-dimensional through shadowing. The most important masterpieces by Caravaggio are centrally displayed. But my favorite part was the eight chapels, each one dedicated to a patron saint of the langues (regions). Here's a photo of the Chapel of Italy, dedicated to St Catherine.

I also learned that because of its strategic location as a military and naval fortress, Malta was ­­­one of the most heavily bombed countries during WWII. Valletta’s streets and buildings, including the Royal Opera House, were left in ruins. And yet, despite having survived battles for hundreds of years, Valletta has remained strong and victorious. 

I decided to name our first collection of backpacks after this historical town of Valletta. There’s something powerful and alluring about its resiliency and colorful riches. Our Valletta backpack represents the strength and beauty that comes from understanding ones roots and fighting for what you believe in.


That’s who we are. We celebrate each other’s cultural diversities, and we stand unafraid and unbridled by what tomorrow brings.

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